CTC Anti-Harassment/Anti-Discrimination Policy

Chico Theater Company Anti-Harassment/Discrimination Policy                                               January 1, 2021

Harassment in a broader sense includes, but is not limited to:

  • Inappropriate or insulting remarks, gestures, jokes, innuendoes or taunting about a person’s gender, gender identity, sexual identity, racial or ethnic background, color, place of birth, citizenship, ancestry, creed, or ability;
  • Unwanted questions or comments about a participant’s private life outside of the boundaries of consent established in rehearsal;
  • Posting or displaying materials, articles, or graffiti, etc. which may cause humiliation, offence or embarrassment on prohibited grounds that are outside the parameters of the production. A production about pornography, violence, racism, etc. may involve such images, but such images are not appropriate for open display in dressing rooms, bathrooms, etc.;

Sexual Harassment in a theatrical workplace:

  • In a theatrical context, harassment will be additionally defined as one or a series of comments or conduct of a gender-related or sexual nature outside the boundaries of consent or production content, that is known or ought reasonably be known to be unwelcome/unwanted, offensive, intimidating, hostile or inappropriate. It is worth noting that the higher the emotional/sexual risk a production asks of its artists, the greater the diligence of each member of production and artistic staffs is expected to foster an environment of emotional safety.
  • Sexual harassment includes but is not limited to:

o Unwelcome remarks, jokes, innuendoes or taunting about a person’s body, attire, gender, or sexual orientation outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Negative stereotyping, race, gender, gender identity, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, marital status, sexual orientation, ability, or other status protected by law outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Unwanted touching or any unwanted or inappropriate physical contact such as touching, kissing, patting, hugging, or pinching outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Unwelcome inquiries or comments about a person’s sex life or sexual preference outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Leering, whistling, or other suggestive or insulting sounds outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Inappropriate comments about clothing, physical characteristics, or activities outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Posting or displaying materials, articles, or graffiti, etc. which is sexually oriented outside the boundaries of consent or production content;

o Requests or demands for sexual favors which include, or strongly imply, promises of rewards for complying (e.g., job advancement opportunities, and/or threats of punishment for refusal (e.g., denial of job advancement or opportunities) outside the boundaries of consent or production content.

  • Participants have the right to be free from:

o Sexual solicitation or advance made by a person in a position to confer, grant or deny a benefit or advancement outside production content;

o Reprisal or threat of reprisal for the rejection of a sexual solicitation or advance where the reprisal is made by a person in a position to grant, confer, or deny a benefit or advancement outside production content.

All or part of the above grounds may create a negative environment for individuals or groups. This may have the effect of “poisoning” the work environment. It should be noted that a person does not have to be a direct target to be adversely affected by a negative environment. It includes conduct or comment that creates and maintains an offensive, hostile, or intimidating climate. It is understood that creative atmospheres are not “emotionally sanitary” – they can safely be bawdy, profane, vulgar, and challenging. We assert that having (a) an environment of building consent and (b) an environment that allows for response to clear boundary violations can broaden our opportunity to be challenging and fearless in our work. Sexual Harassment as it relates to Performances with Sexual Content and Nudity We are committed to maintaining a workplace of risk supported by communication, safety, respect, and accountability, free of harassment and discrimination. We seek an atmosphere where actors can be bold and live moment-to-moment in the given circumstances of the material while being vigilant to their fellow artists’ safety and boundaries. Clear boundaries must therefore be established and agreed upon among the artists involved, both in rehearsals and performance, particularly in scenes depicting violence, sex acts, intimate contact, abuse, or gestures of intimacy. Theatre environments can court confusion about what is freedom, and what is violation or harassment. Theatre can be bawdy, challenge social norms, shock, offend and even arouse. We do so with integrity when that freedom to express, engage and risk is collective, inclusive, and accountable. We believe that freedom in the theatre can engender both freedom and boundaries. With that in mind, we seek to clarify sexual harassment as it pertains to rehearsal and performance, and to outline recourse when abuses occur.

Sexual harassment in theatrical workplaces also includes, but is not limited to:

  • Attempting to engage in sexual behaviors offstage that are choreographed for the stage;
  • Suggesting a performer who appears naked onstage or in rehearsal is not allowed physical boundaries and/or privacy backstage or in the dressing room and/or not respecting those boundaries;
  • Not respecting the dressing room codes set forth by the CTC;
  • Inviting a performer to rehearse sexual content outside of scheduled rehearsals;
  • Repeated invitation/suggestion to take relationships of a sexual nature beyond the stage;
  • Using the text of a production that is sexual, violent, threatening or offensive in offstage discourse;
  • Improvising with sexual content without expressed consent. Repeated violations of sexual staging, violation of boundaries, or ignoring the limitations of consent, can be grounds for a sexual harassment complaint. Deviating from sexual content choreography is tantamount to deviating from fight choreography. It is considered unsafe, unethical, and grounds for response from stage management and the producer. Sexual harassment can result in immediate dismissal. Concerns about harassment, safety, or a negative environment may be reported through the channels set forth in the Complaint Path portion of this Code of Conduct.